Global Studies 

A song about peace

By Cullen Kobayashi

Curiosity has been a driving force for Samuel Benda, who will be graduating in the fall of 2017 with degrees in global studies and political science. He is currently immersed in his senior research project which is focused on native African music and its cultural context. Benda describes his project as a way of teaching the African culture behind the music. "I am focusing on how we can teach African music to Americans. I want to show that African music is much more than the songs themselves, it is an activity," he explains. "The culture should not be lost as it is the foundation and heart of the music." 

africa’s Green Revolution: An Examination of Agricultural Development

By Cullen Kobayashi

Professor Rachel Schurman is leading an ongoing research project, titled "Firms, Foundations, States, and the New 'Green Revolution' for Africa," that examines the rapid changes in African agriculture that have occurred since the 1990s. As a part of this work, she intends to map the institutional architecture of numerous agricultural networks and analyze how these networks were formed.

Univeristy of Human Rights

By Cullen Kobayashi

Professor Barbara Frey describes the University of Minnesota as "the human rights university." Having served as director of the Human Rights Program (HRP) since 2001, Frey is heavily involved in engaging students and researchers with real-world human rights issues.

global studies runs in the family

By Cullen Kobayashi

Last summer Aimee, Matthew, and Katey Lace piled into the car with their parents for a cross-country trip from Minnesota to New York City. It was a tight fit, but they all wanted to be there to move 2014 global studies alumna Aimee into her new apartment. After two years working as an individual contractor at the United Nations Institute for Training and Research in Geneva, Aimee was starting her PhD at Columbia University in social-organizational psychology.  

the dialect of art

By Cullen Kobayashi

Mapping Transitions through the Vehicle of the Arts is a research program unlike any other at the University of Minnesota. Through funding from the Luce Foundation, art professor Thomas Rose was given the opportunity to create a project that explores the arts, humanities, and religions of Asia.

global studies book club for educators

By Cullen Kobayashi

The Institute for Global Studies offers a variety of professional development programs for teachers in the Twin Cities area. One new program, the IGS Book Club for Educators, began in spring 2016. The first semester focused on culture in African countries, while this fall the book club focused on cultures of Latin America. Led by Deborah Jane, IGS's outreach coordinator, this program offers award-winning educational resources for K-12 teachers.

beyond the borders of the calssromom

By Robert Koons

Sarah Abdella-El Kallassy is a global studies senior who has had a positive impact on people at home and abroad through her experiences and commitment to cultural awareness.

bullfighting: culture and democracy in modern spain

By Robert Koons

In July of 2010, Catalonia became the second province in Spain to place a ban on the centuries old tradition of bullfighting. In 1939, Spain, following the Spanish Civil War, turned to the tourist industry as a primary economic engine. Although bullfighting was historically tied to the southern regions of the country, during the Francoist dictatorship bullfighting was highly touted in tourist literature as a top attraction for visitors to Spain. Bullfighting became a cultural custom that was imposed on many regions, including Catalonia, by the Francoist regime.

Holocaust Education in a Global Context

By Robert Koons

Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Global Studies host K-12 teachers for genocide workshop

the importance of ommunity engagement

By Andrew Swisher

Undergraduate Ricardo Bennett-Guzman came to the University of Minnesota from Juarez, Mexico—a city considered one of the most dangerous in the world. “I have always been very interested in the interconnections and interactions on a global scale given that I grew up in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, on one of the largest borders in the world,” Guzman says. “As a young child, it was glaringly obvious how connected the two countries were, and yet I was experiencing the extreme disparities. More recently as Mexico experienced its drug war, I witnessed first-hand mass migration out of the country. These experiences left many questions and my studies have given me the opportunity to begin to make sense out of them.”

the unseen global city

By Andrew Swisher

“In today’s modern century, countries are conducting a massive social experiment, rapidly converting cities into the next ‘global city’ like Shanghai, Dubai, and Istanbul,” says Professor Michael Goldman. “Global cities are alive with two very different social imaginaries: Those who desire to rebuild the city with ‘world-class’ infrastructure versus the urban majority’s concerns of being dispossessed by these elite projects.”

benerfits of Collaborative learning

Tom Wolfe, associate professor of history and global studies, taught a European Studies course last spring with a unique approach. The course was structured like a think tank with four areas of focus: regional separatism; the trials of the single currency; immigration and identity, and the development and security of Europe’s “neighborhood.” Students chose a theme and then worked to become an expert in that theme. Through writing and discussion students were able to develop a sense of both the historical background of their issue and the complicated decisions policy makers were facing in the short term.