Geography, Environment & Society

Kate Carlson: mapping her future

By Michael Jouris

Kate Carlson has always enjoyed art and analytics. After asking herself what major combines her passions and would play to her strengths, she thought, "Making maps can be very artistic and analytical at the same time." It was this conclusion that led her to enroll in a biogeography course with Professor Scott St. George her first semester at the U.

leveraging Spatial Data to Examine the World’s Grand Challenges

By Michael Jouris

New to the georgraphy department, Assistant Professor Eric Shook's research is interdisciplinary, allowing him to "bring social scientists into the computational landscape and help solve some of the world's biggest problems; problems in health, crime, risks, and hazards all can be examined from a diverse lens by leveraging big spatial data," he says.

from 0-2: Engaging Innovation

By Michael Jouris

Second year PhD student Chelsea L Cervantes De Blois has a rich background in research-related field work both domestically and abroad. She speaks multiple languages and has worked in several different countries, including Azerbaijan in 2014-2015 as a Fulbright recipient, followed by stints in Serbia and Kyrgyzstan as an agricultural consultant. De Blois has also worked intensively on climate change projects with the US Department of State and the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), a global agricultural research partnership. This diverse background helped De Blois earn a prestigious fellowship and role in a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project on crowd sourcing innovation.

a Modern Explorer

By Lauren Myhra

MGIS alumnus Cole Kelleher created a Google "Street View" of Antarctica

A nation within a nation

 

By Lauren Myhra

Kate Derickson is working with the Gullah/Geechee Nation to understand how environmental changes affect their livelihoods

maintaining the psirit of engagement

By Lauren Myhra

In 2001, the Department of Geography, Environment and Society lost a large presence: John Borchert, Regents Professor and founding director of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA), passed away. In addition to contributing immensely to the University, he also believed strongly in reaching out to the communities surrounding campus and in greater Minnesota.

How climate change is influencing birthrate in africa

By Michael Jouris

In the United States, we know everything about our domestic agriculture thanks to the USDA and agricultural monitoring. But not all countries have the luxury of these programs, which is a challenge for Assistant Professor Kathryn Grace, who studies how varying climates impact poor women and families in Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso, Africa. She uses a combination of climate data, satellite data, on the ground interviews, large-scale surveys, and fieldwork to “Tell as complete of a story about how people live, and the things they deal with, as possible.”

geography and CLA pave the way for a career in academia

By Michael Jouris

Like many freshmen, Talia Anderson wasn’t sure what major or field of study she would pursue over the next four years. The desire to study abroad and continue learning Spanish led her to pursue a Spanish degree, but she decided later to also major in geography because of her broad interests and the diverse coursework in the major. “Geography strikes a really good balance between the humanities and the sciences. and can delve into more scientific fields through studying topics such as climate,” Anderson says.

brown day 2016

By Michael Jouris

In the fall of 1962, geography professors Cotton Mather and Fred Lukermann put their heads together to envision the inaugural Ralph H. Brown Day to celebrate the department and honor outstanding student achievement. What began as an idea from Lukermann for an annual lecture to commemorate long-time faculty member Ralph H. Brown was broadened by Mather, then chair of the department, to an all-day event.