Anthropology 

Undergraduate Anthropology Club: Above and Beyond

By Laura Beier

The Undergraduate Anthropology Club, one of the most thriving and involved student groups on the University of Minnesota campus, exceeds expectations with weekly events, discussions spanning across all anthropological fields, and grant-writing skills that allow them to host outstanding events such as their annual conference.

Students and Companies Learn Together In Business Anthropology Class

By Laura Beier

In Business Anthropology, a class taught by the chair of the Department of Anthropology William Beeman, students are able to apply cultural anthropological tools to real life situations. Paired with companies in the Twin Cities area, students are assigned projects and work to provide objectives and insight to problems in a “real world” setting.

Political Prisoners Persevere: Turkish Conflict and Effects on the Kurds

By Laura Beier

Future anthropology department faculty member Serra Hakyemez has spent years researching the Turkish conflict, political prisoners in Turkey, and cultural aspects of the Kurdish movement. Through immersing herself and interviewing prisoners themselves, she has analyzed how the government and Kurdish dissidents relate to one another, and the consequences for both sides of the fight.

undergraduate primate research in kenya

By Laura Beier

Third-year undergraduate Amber Jaeger has had several amazing opportunities during her study of biological anthropology, and specifically ape and human evolution. She completed a field work in Kenya this past summer, focusing on paleoanthropological and archaeological methods. In addition, her avid interest in osteology led her to conduct a study on two fossil primate mandibles to help understand when monkeys and ape lineages first split. This project even resulted in a submitted abstract to present her research at the annual meetings of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.  

reframing the way we look at ancient civilizations

By Laura Beier

building a bridge between science and social studies

By Laura Beier

Katrina Yezzi-Woodley has taken her vast knowledge of biological anthropology and found a way to share it with students at Maple Grove Middle School. The founder of a program called Social Studies and Science Adventures, Yezzi-Woodley has brought teachers, students of the University, and middle-school students together to learn more about the perfect combination of social studies and science: anthropology.

dancing in the desert

By Katelyn Faulks

ballet performance& political production

By Katelyn Faulks

Meryl Lodge is discovering how professional ballet in South Africa reflects both culture and politics.

the public & politics: clarifying confusion

By Katelyn Faulks

Beeman’s public lectures have helped communicate new perspectives about the Iran Deal to the Minneapolis community.

anthropoligical adventures

By Katelyn Faulks

After a long career dedicated to teaching and research in sociocultural anthropology, Professor Stephen Gudeman has retired. A symposium will be held to honor his career November 20, but until then, we reflect on his anthropological journey. Gudeman’s symposium also kicks off celebrations for “100 Years of Minnesota Anthropology.”

negotiating bilungual space

By Katelyn Faulks

When do bilingual people switch between one language to another? In her honors thesis, senior Courtney Fields seeks to uncover how Latino and white American restaurant workers negotiate speaking Spanish and English. Her research, coursework, and personal experience has led her to discover how English persists as dominant over Spanish, even in a nation that claims no “official” language.

paving the way towards preservation

By Katelyn Faulks

Professor Kat Hayes has always been interested in thinking “through dirt” by analyzing the material aspects of human life. Through materials, she explains, humans make sense of their identity subconsciously, which allows different stories to shine through that may not make it to the history books. But what is more compelling, she says, is to collaborate with groups, like native or immigrant communities, to interpret their own histories by facilitating access to work with their ancestral materials.

Digging Deeper: New Methods Give Archaeology an Edge

By Katelyn Faulks

Anthropologists know that modern humans and Neanderthals were similar enough species that they saw each other as mating partners: they interbred when they met approximately 50,000 years ago, and Neanderthal DNA survives in many of us today.  Yet, big questions remain about how “human” Neanderthals were: Did they make art and music? Did they make clothing and shelters? Did they have language?  Even seemingly more mundane questions, such as how they used stone tools, remain.

the conspiracy within

By Katelyn Faulks

PhD candidate Murat Altun’s research concerns how humans act suspicious through ritual. “My ethnographic research maps the ways in which "rituals of suspicion" take their forms. I am particularly interested in conspiracy theories in Turkey, where the allure of popular conspiracy theoricism has recently expanded into government politics.”

translating transnational health

By Katelyn Faulks

Mai See Thao combines academic and community health research through her work with Hmong-American communities in the Twin Cities areas and abroad. By coupling advocacy and research Mai See Thao not only explores how Hmong-Americans make sense of their chronic illnesses, but also helps them connect with others who have a shared experience